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 What are affixes?

Affixes are typically described as groups of letters added at the beginning or the end of a word. By adding these letters you are usually changing the meaning and a possible function of the original word.


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Who       Which        Whom       Whose

All of them are question words used in the beginning of relative clauses.
Relative clauses are used to either identify people or things or to give extra information about them.


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As you may already know, there are many ways to talk about the future in English. In today’s grammar workshop we will be looking at some more advanced ways of talking about the future.


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Comma Use.

Punctuation is an equally important part of the accurate written speech.

Below you can find a list of most common rules which will help you use comma correctly.


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Ever, never, just, already, yet in Present Perfect.

As we’ve already established, Present Perfect performs as a link the present and the past and we use it when we talk about our experience. In this case, we quite often add adverbs ever or never.
They both refer to an unspecified time until now and always placed before the past participle.


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The phrases “in time” and “on time” are very similar in meaning and there is a subtle difference in their usage in English.

On time refers to ‘a specific time’ when something is supposed/expected to happen, and it is happening as planned.


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A brief summary of the main things you need to remember about Present Perfect!

Present Perfect is formed as follows:

Subject + has/have + past participle


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I've seen many students struggling with structures where they have to use a gerund or an infinitive. Usually the best advice that a teacher can give is to learn as many structures as possible as certain verbs are followed by a gerund and others by an infinitive and there is no explanation as to why this happens.


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1. We use Zero conditional sentences to talk about absolute facts, habitual actions, or scientific phenomenaThe time is present in both clauses. The situation is real.

If you light a match, it burns.
My roommate always cooks if I don’t have time.

How to structure?
If + present simple, verb in present simple.